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Indonesia and UN sign programme to tackle deforestation and climate change

The Indonesia UN-REDD programme was signed at the National Dialogue on Climate Change, a high-level meeting organized on 23 November by the Ministry of Environment and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP)



In an effort to address climate change by stopping the destruction of Indonesia’s vast forests, the Ministry of Forestry and UN agencies signed the UN-REDD national programme on 23 November, just in time for the upcoming Copenhagen climate change negotiations this December. The REDD concept is expected to be one of the most crucial agendas to be discussed in Copenhagen.

The UN-REDD programme was signed at the National Dialogue on Climate Change, a high-level meeting organized on 23 November by the Ministry of Environment and UNDP. Indonesia is one of nine UN-REDD Programme pilot countries and part of a global effort.

REDD has become an eminent priority for Indonesia and the global community, since deforestation and forest degradation represent a major source of greenhouse gas emissions, in addition to hindering human development and threatening biodiversity. Indeed, according to the Second National Communication also launched today, more than half of Indonesia’s greenhouse gas emissions are related to forestry peat land sectors (except 2003).

According to Norwegian Minister of the Environment and International Development, H.E. Mr. Erik Solheim, present in the signing ceremony, “Globally, almost 20 percent of the world’s greenhouse gas emissions come from deforestation and forest degradation. Therefore, Norway is committed to support developing countries, like Indonesia, to stop the devastating destruction of the forest.”

The Stern Review states that addressing deforestation and forest degradation is a cost effective method of reducing GHG emissions, while also preserving biodiversity and local livelihoods. Further, it is important from the UN perspective to ensure that in any REDD scheme the rights of local communities and other issues pertaining to the MDGs are fully considered.

“A key challenge will be to ensure monitoring, reporting and verification – this will be a priority for the UN-REDD Programme” said Man Ho So, FAO Representative in Indonesia.

“Most of Indonesia’s green house gas emissions come from deforestation and degradation of land” said Hakan Bjorkman, UNDP Country Director in Indonesia. “This initiative is therefore central to Indonesia’s response to climate change”.

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In this issue

News

Spain becomes a donor to the UN-REDD Programme

Indonesia and UN sign programme to tackle deforestation and climate change

Official launch of the UN-REDD Programme in Tanzania

Enhancing carbon monitoring systems through satellite imagery

Viet Nam study on a benefit distribution system to be released at COP15



Features & Commentary

Ecuador: taking firm steps towards REDD --Marco Chiu, Environmental Specialist of the Socio Bosque Program



Reports & Analysis

UN-REDD Programme in Latin America: highlights on recent dialogue with civil society

El Programa ONU-REDD en América Latina: Información destacada sobre el diálogo reciente con la sociedad civil

Planning for REDD readiness -- the Tanzania case

Carbon Stock Assessment and Modelling in Zambia: a UN-REDD Programme study



Looking ahead

United Nations Climate Change Conference (COP15)
7-18 December 2009, Copenhagen, Denmark

Forest Day 3
13 December, Copenhagen, Denmark.



Previous issues

August 2009

September 2009

October 2009



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